Twilight

 Landscape, Live Life, Quote  Comments Off on Twilight
Jan 162015
 
Twilight

Twilight

My eyes always keep searching,
something inexpressible,
above the far sky.
I long to get Lost,
inside the Evening-Twilight.
Silence always tickles me
—in a strange way;
I meet “me” in the time
between Sunset and Darkness.
~ Sabr Muz Leemah
Your Voice Around the World

Sunset Wishes

 Landscape, Quote  Comments Off on Sunset Wishes
Dec 242014
 
Sunset wish and hope

Sunset wish and hope

To wish was to hope and to hope was to expect ~ Jane Austin

What is Prairie Restoration?

 Landscape  Comments Off on What is Prairie Restoration?
Mar 202014
 
James Nedresky.prairie fire. flint hills, ks

James Nedresky.prairie fire. flint hills, ks

Prairie restoration is an ecologically friendly way to restore some of the prairie land that was lost to industry, farming and commerce. For example, the U.S. state of Illinois alone once held over 35,000 square miles (91,000 km2) of prairie land and now just 3 square miles (7.8 km2) of original prairie land exist.

Purpose

Ecologically, prairie restoration aids in conservation of earth’s topsoil, which is often exposed to erosion from wind and rain when prairies are plowed under to make way for new commerce. Conversely, much more of the prairie lands have become the fertile fields on which cereal crops of corn, barley and wheat are grown.

Many prairie plants are also highly resistant to drought, temperature extremes, disease, and native insect pests. They are frequently used for xeriscaping projects in arid regions of the American West.

A restoration project of prairie lands can be large or small. A backyard prairie restoration will enrich soil, help with erosion and take up extra water in excessive rainfalls. Prairie flowers are attractive to native butterflies and other pollinators. On a larger scale, communities and corporations are creating areas of restored prairies which in turn will store organic carbon in the soil and help maintain the biodiversity of the 3000 plus species that count on the grasslands for food and shelter.

 Types of plants

Prairie plants consist of grasses and forbs. Grasses, which are monocots, are similar to what may be in a yard, but grasses in the prairie will be of a broader leaf. Some prominent tallgrass prairie grasses include Big Bluestem, Indiangrass, and Switchgrass. Midgrass and shortgrass species include Little Bluestem and Buffalograss. Forbs fall into an unusual category. They are not grasses, trees or shrubs, but are herbaceous and share the field with the less diverse grasses. Most wildflowers and legumes are forbs. Forbs are structurally specialized to resist herbaceous grazers such as American bison, and their commonly hairy leaves help deter the cold and prevent excessive evaporation. Many of the forbs contain secondary compounds that were discovered by the American Natives and are still used widely today. One particular forb, the purple coneflower, is recognized more readily by its scientific name Echinacea purpurea, or just Echinacea, which is used as an herbal remedy for colds.

Early prairie restoration efforts tended to focus largely on a few dominant species, typically grasses, with little attention to seed source. With experience, later restorers have realized the importance of obtaining a broad mix of species and using local ecotype seed.[1]

 Care of prairies

Fire is a big component to the success of grasslands, large or small. Controlled burns, with a permit, are recommended every 4–8 years (after two growth seasons) to burn away dead plants; prevent certain other plants from encroaching (such as trees) and release nutrients into the ground to encourage new growth. A much more wildlife habitat friendly alternative to burning every 4–8 years is to burn 1/4 to 1/8 of a tract every year. This will leave wildlife a home every year and still accomplish the task of burning. The Native Americans may also have used the burns to control pests such as ticks.

If controlled burns are not possible, rotational mowing is recommended as a substitute.

One of the newer methods available is holistic management, which uses livestock as a substitute for the keystone species such as bison. This allows the rotational mowing to be done by animals which in turn mimics nature more closely. Holistic management also can use fire as a tool, but in a more limited way and in combination with the mowing done by animals.[2]

Wikipedia: Prairie Restoration

Photo Source by James Nedresky.prairie fire,Flint Hills, Kansas
via http://is.gd/uceOc0ht

St.Petersburg, Russia by Khalis Karl

 Landscape, Urban  Comments Off on St.Petersburg, Russia by Khalis Karl
Dec 132013
 
St.Petersburg By Khalis Karl.p

St.Petersburg By Khalis Karl

Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербург, tr. Sankt-Peterburg, IPA: [sankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( )) is a city and a federal subject (a federal city) of Russia located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. In 1914 the name of the city was changed from Saint Petersburg to Petrograd (Russian: Петроград, IPA: [pʲɪtrɐˈgrat]), in 1924 to Leningrad (Russian: Ленинград, IPA: [lʲɪnʲɪnˈgrat]), and in 1991, back to Saint Petersburg.

aint Petersburg was founded by the Tsar Peter the Great on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703. From 1713 to 1728 and from 1732 to 1918, Saint Petersburg was the Imperial capital of Russia. In 1918 the central government bodies moved from Saint Petersburg (then named Petrograd) to Moscow.[11] It is Russia’s second largest city after Moscow with 5 million inhabitants (2012) and the fourth most populated federal subject.[6] Saint Petersburg is a major European cultural center, and also an important Russian port on the Baltic Sea. Saint Petersburg is often described as the most Western city of Russia, as well as its cultural capital.[12] It is the northernmost city in the world to have a population of over one million. The Historic Centre of Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments constitute a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Saint Petersburg is also home to The Hermitage, one of the largest art museums in the world.[13] A large number of foreign consulates, international corporations, banks and other businesses are located in Saint Petersburg.

St.Peterburg

Photo: Khalis Karl via Reshare

 

 

After watching the sunset, how could you settle for something less than amazing?

 Landscape  Comments Off on After watching the sunset, how could you settle for something less than amazing?
Dec 122013
 

After watching the sunset, how could you settle for something less than amazing?

heron in water

Only in Paradise by Alpharius in deviantart

Only in Paradise by Alpharius in deviantart

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